A Savvy Authors Blog Post: Authors Behaving Badly

Hey everyone! As promised, I’m back with my link for the blog post I did for Savvy Authors. The blog is entitled Authors Behaving Badly, and I hope you’ll drop by and leave a comment about your experiences along this line. We’ve all had to deal with this on some level–I’m interested to know what you think!

Woods2In other news, I’m about 25 K into the sequel for Unspeakable Words. My workload is picking up, at the same time that I’m planning to go out of town for the Galacticon3 convention, so finding the time and energy to write right now is difficult, but I am loving ‘meeting’ these characters again and getting to know them all over again. What I wouldn’t give for 2-3 weeks off right now!  Especially since spring has been deliciously cool this year. I’d love to be outdoors taking advantage of it before the blazing heat and energy-sucking humidity kicks in!

However, Dreamspinner Press is making the month of May merry for *everyone* as they continue to celebrate turning six this year–with changing discounts, free stories, and prize giveaways all month long–you need to go check this out!

The Boys of Summer continues to receive glowing (and often very touching) 5 star reviews. I’m deeply honored by this feedback, guys. You have no idea what it’s like for authors to receive such positive comments on their work. It validates our efforts, but more than that, it’s like crack! It feeds the writer-beast inside of us, and we hunker down at the keyboard to write some more! Thank you all so much. 🙂

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10 thoughts on “A Savvy Authors Blog Post: Authors Behaving Badly

  1. Great post! (I wasn’t able to easily leave a comment on Savvy Authors, not quite sure where the “create account” area is 😉

    I totally agree (and am guilty of knee jerk reactions and occsaionally putting my foot in it). We’re supposed to be professionals, that means acting like it in public.

    Of course there *are* some things I think are worth speaking out for/against even if it ticks other people off (although thankfully most of the things I’m for and against strongly enough to talk about won’t offend the majority of people who read what I write). That said, I’ve started culling my FB “friends” list over strong opinions. Not that I don’t believe in everyone’s right to free speech, but if I don’t know someone in real life, I’m far less inclined to be interested in their extremist point of view, especially if my viewpoint is on the opposite side of the argument (or if I’m just so sick of it, I think my eyes will bleed if I see one more post about X). Why should my feed be glutted with that when there are people I *really* want to hear from? I try to keep that in mind when I post something, too. Unless I really believe in it, why risk ticking people off?
    H.B. Pattskyn recently posted..And the Plot Thickens….My Profile

    • That said, I’ve started culling my FB “friends” list over strong opinions. Not that I don’t believe in everyone’s right to free speech, but if I don’t know someone in real life, I’m far less inclined to be interested in their extremist point of view, especially if my viewpoint is on the opposite side of the argument (or if I’m just so sick of it, I think my eyes will bleed if I see one more post about X). Why should my feed be glutted with that when there are people I *really* want to hear from?

      Oh, my YES! WORD. I’ve begun doing that too. Mostly in an effort to keep my blood pressure down. 🙂

      Hah, I didn’t know it wasn’t that easy to leave a comment over at SA–thank you for trying! And like you, I think there are some things you should speak out strongly in favor of–even if it ticks other people off. I do think you have to moderate it though–as you said, not hammer that one point home to the point that you make people roll their eyes and hide your posts. Unless it’s about Iron Man and Tony Stark. Then all bets are off. 🙂

  2. Some things seem like they should be common sense, but it’s kind of amazing how many people lack common sense nowadays.

    Congrats on your feedback on “The Boys of Summer.” Wonderful news! 🙂 And I totally agree – good reviews = author crack. Nom nom.
    Nico Jaye recently posted..Active Pro Athlete Comes OutMy Profile

  3. The other site didn’t like me either, so here’s my somewhat rambling comment I tried to leave.

    I’ve always found it odd how upset people can be when they find out someone they’re a fan of is human. It seems as if they feel personally betrayed if the person they admire has differing views than what they, the fan, has projected onto the writer, celebrity, etc.

    I personally stopped reading a popular mystery writer when I found out she and a friend had murdered the friend’s mother when young. I never threw a fit, or told others who loved her books to stop reading them, and have no hatred for the woman. It was just, for me, to much to know. I felt like she was using her personal knowledge of murder for gain. I don’t care about small differences, religion, politics, etc., but the biggies, yeah. Those can make me reconsider. But it never occurred to me to actively hate or attack her.

    The problem with social media is that it can creates a feeling of friendship and closeness when there really isn’t one. When all you know about someone through their Facebook, Twitter, or Tumbler, you’re only going to see a small facet of that person. Combine that with how easy it is to say horrible things to them because you don’t have to see the results of how hurtful your words are (shock, pain, tears,), it becomes very easy to justify hurting people. Humans are a complex species, and I know that if all I knew about my 2 closest friends was through social media, we would have destroyed each other by now. Actually knowing them makes me be considerate about how we disagree, and embrace the differences we share, because it expands our worlds.

    I guess what I’m saying in a not very clear way, is that if you’re a public figure, a true fan will still accept that you may have differing thoughts and ideas from them, and can still enjoy what you offer. (Books, acting, etc.) You are much more than your public self. If there is a breaking point, like I had, keep your mouth shut. What’s done is done. Unless you are offered a fauxpolgy (I’m sorry if you were offended, not about what I said) , then you, as a public figure, deserve the shit-storm.

    There is a time and place for confrontation, such as the mentioned racism, gay-bashing, or finding out someone agrees with Free Republic, but when it comes to smaller things, not so much. If you can’t agree, just walk away.

    • Well, I know what you mean. I frequently run into people who say, ” I can no longer watch ‘so-and-so’ or read their books, or whatever because they feel strongly about something that person has said or done or stands for–and that’s their prerogative. Like you, I’m a live and let live person, so it is a little harder for me to understand why this same objector feels the need to let everyone else know as well–in order to effect a kind of boycott, as it were.

      I do accept that celebrities aren’t the people they portray, but I am also aware that my impressions of someone’s personal behavior and beliefs can color how I feel about their work, too. So as even though I fangirl as much as the next person, I tend to keep some distance between me and my favorite celebrities because I don’t necessarily want to know too much about them. I don’t want to learn anything that might spoil my enjoyment of their work.

      However, I celebrate their right to be passionate about those beliefs. It’s a fine line though, and one that’s difficult for a lot of people to walk with any sort of grace.

      I wasn’t just referring to that, however. I guess part of what I was trying to say here deals with upsetting things that happen: something is worded badly, or offensively, and people react without thinking through their responses–and are quite often penalized by fans for doing so. Getting defensive or angry about a bad review isn’t smart. But neither is pissing off a huge portion of your fan base by indicating that you don’t respect them. I’ve seen a bunch of online conflagrations lately, that would have been best served if people had just sat on their comments for 24 hours. 🙂
      Sarah Madison recently posted..A Savvy Authors Blog Post: Authors Behaving BadlyMy Profile

      • Ah, now now I understand. Until bad phrasing shows itself to be a “habit”, I give the benefit of the doubt. We all say stupid things because we don’t think them through. More so, if we only communicate through words.

        • Sometimes, though the problem is the phrasing is unintentionally insulting–triggering a huge reaction from the group of people who feel insulted. That kind of situation blows up so fast that it’s hard for people to sit on their hands and stay out of it.

          You’re right, though! More people *should* sit back and wait and see what is really going on before chiming in. 🙂

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